City Downland Estate Plan - Have Your Say

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Brighton & Hove’s rural estate is made up of around 12,800 acres of land in the South Downs National Park. You can read about out City Downland Estate Plan on the council website.

Together with residents we are developing a new vision for this valuable asset in the city. It is a unique opportunity to explore how we can use this land to help tackle the climate and biodiversity emergencies and reduce carbon emissions.


Creation of the City Downland Estate Plan - UPDATE

The public engagement process held from November 2020 to April 2021, alongside Planning For Real, created a fantastic response from the wider Brighton & Hove community. A huge amount of feedback was submitted and this has been compiled in two reports that you can read in our ‘Public Engagement’ section on this page.

The work completed by the attendees of the ‘Carousel’ session in April 2021 to consider the findings from the public engagement process and put forward recommendations, has now been taken forward as the foundation that the draft City Downland Estate Plan will be created from.

Attendees at the ‘Carousel’ event worked in four break out groups and each put forward a proposal for the vision that will be used in the City Downland Estate Plan. Since the event in April, Planning For Real analysed these visions for reoccurring themes and led sessions with Councillors to build on these ideas and finalise the vision that will be used in the plan. You can read this here.


Next Steps

Now that the vision is in place, the draft City Downland Estate Plan can be developed. The action plan within this, that sets out the future plans for the estate will be created using the recommendations from the public engagement exercise, with input from BHCC officers/members, South Downs National Parks Assoc and key stakeholders.

We are also enlisting NatCap Research to consider the proposals being put forward within the action plan, in order to provide a measurement of the positive impact they would have on our natural capital.

Once the draft has been developed, it will then be taken to the South Downs National Parks Assoc for the first step in their process of endorsing this as a Whole Estate Plan.

After this, there will be another public engagement process where everyone will get a chance to review the draft plan and provide feedback. Further information on this will be forthcoming.

The indicative timeline that sets out the steps for creating the plan can be viewed below. This shows all the steps mentioned above as we move towards the plan being approved at the council’s Policy & Resources committee, and endorsed by the South Downs National Parks Assoc.

Thank you for your ongoing interest in the City Downland Estate Plan. If you have any questions on the above, please contact us at citydownlandestateplan@brighton-hove.gov.uk.

Brighton & Hove’s rural estate is made up of around 12,800 acres of land in the South Downs National Park. You can read about out City Downland Estate Plan on the council website.

Together with residents we are developing a new vision for this valuable asset in the city. It is a unique opportunity to explore how we can use this land to help tackle the climate and biodiversity emergencies and reduce carbon emissions.


Creation of the City Downland Estate Plan - UPDATE

The public engagement process held from November 2020 to April 2021, alongside Planning For Real, created a fantastic response from the wider Brighton & Hove community. A huge amount of feedback was submitted and this has been compiled in two reports that you can read in our ‘Public Engagement’ section on this page.

The work completed by the attendees of the ‘Carousel’ session in April 2021 to consider the findings from the public engagement process and put forward recommendations, has now been taken forward as the foundation that the draft City Downland Estate Plan will be created from.

Attendees at the ‘Carousel’ event worked in four break out groups and each put forward a proposal for the vision that will be used in the City Downland Estate Plan. Since the event in April, Planning For Real analysed these visions for reoccurring themes and led sessions with Councillors to build on these ideas and finalise the vision that will be used in the plan. You can read this here.


Next Steps

Now that the vision is in place, the draft City Downland Estate Plan can be developed. The action plan within this, that sets out the future plans for the estate will be created using the recommendations from the public engagement exercise, with input from BHCC officers/members, South Downs National Parks Assoc and key stakeholders.

We are also enlisting NatCap Research to consider the proposals being put forward within the action plan, in order to provide a measurement of the positive impact they would have on our natural capital.

Once the draft has been developed, it will then be taken to the South Downs National Parks Assoc for the first step in their process of endorsing this as a Whole Estate Plan.

After this, there will be another public engagement process where everyone will get a chance to review the draft plan and provide feedback. Further information on this will be forthcoming.

The indicative timeline that sets out the steps for creating the plan can be viewed below. This shows all the steps mentioned above as we move towards the plan being approved at the council’s Policy & Resources committee, and endorsed by the South Downs National Parks Assoc.

Thank you for your ongoing interest in the City Downland Estate Plan. If you have any questions on the above, please contact us at citydownlandestateplan@brighton-hove.gov.uk.

Your Contributions

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    Moutain biking

    by Jocrypto, 8 months ago
    Me and my son moutain bike around the area it keeps us fit and gives us so much enjoyment . I find it disturbing that walkers complain about mountain bikers

    We do not complain about walkers but trust me there are some horrible walkers out there !!

    The countryside should be enjoyed by all without prejudice and moutain bikers need a place to enjoy as well as anyone else

    It would be great if there was more support for mountain biking . It’s grown massively and we have only just taken up the sport

    It’s an amazing way to keep... Continue reading

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    Benfield Valley Nature Reserve

    by Kayla Potter-Jones, 8 months ago

    Benfield Valley Local Nature Reserve is the last green lung in Brighton and Hove that links Hangleton and Portslade to the South Downs yet it is under threat to building development. Benfield Valley has already been sited as an area of importance which makes it even more baffling that this area has even been considered as a housing development site.

    Supporting both deciduous woodland and chalk grassland this site is not only a hub for wildlife, but an important greenspace for locals too. Benfield Valley is situated in a deprived area where locals are already limited to accessible greenspace. This... Continue reading

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    Footpaths to the downs, signs and crossings over A27

    by Anne Tyndale, 8 months ago

    FOOTPATHS TO THE DOWNS, SIGNS and CROSSINGS

    Members of the Socialist and Environment Resources Association (SERA) are keen to encourage the people of Brighton and Hove to experience the enjoyment of exploring the downs which belong to them. There are many FOOTPATHS leading from the city into the National Park, such as the one through Ladies Mile Nature Reserve, but these are not always easy to find. It is also important that the paths should be suitable for wheelchairs and scooters for the disabled.

    We urge the Council to make clear maps of all these paths.

    Foot path across Ladies... Continue reading

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    Brighton Downs Alliance Key Points and Principles for the City Downland Estate Plan

    by Brighton Downs Alliance, 8 months ago



    Brighton Downs Alliance (BDA)

    We are a group of organisations, experts & community, campaigning for the fairer, sustainably managed & accessible public Downs of Brighton & Hove (B&H):

    Beacon Hub, Rottingdean; Benfield Valley Project; Brighton Active Travel; B&H Archaeological Society; B&H Food Partnership; B&H Friends of the Earth; B&H Wildlife Forum; Butterfly Conservation Sussex Branch; Coldean Community Organisation; Campaign to Protect Rural England Sussex; Extinction Rebellion Brighton; Friends of Hollingdean Park; Friends of Waterhall; Friends of Whitehawk Hill, Keep Our Downs Public; Keep the Ridge Green; Moulsecoomb Forest Garden & Wildlife Project; Royal Agricultural University (NR); South Downs Society; Stanmer... Continue reading

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    The end of Falmer Forge

    by Sue Craig, 8 months ago

    A selection of historic photographs of Falmer before the construction of the A27 through the heart of the village, including the demolition of a number of cottages and the old Smithy, marking the sad end of two generations of blacksmithing. I don't know about his father, but Les Slarks was also a chimneysweep as well as a blacksmith.
    The audio is from a recording of 2001 from Charlie Yeates, a leading light and founder member of the Stanmer Preservation Society 50 years ago.

    https://youtu.be/Ln6lqhZyRAY


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    Improve access and accessibility for health, wellbeing and tourism

    by Kim Greaves, 8 months ago

    Studies have shown that when compared UK national averages, the people of Brighton and Hove experience high levels of both mild and serious mental illness, and general low levels of mental wellbeing. (http://www.bhconnected.org.uk/sites/bhconnected/files/7.5.9%20Mental%20health%20JSNA%202016.pdf ). Non-communicable lifestyle influenced diseases such as obesity, heart disease and diabetes also exert a major toll on our population. This is extremely costly to people’s lives, our community at large and in particular to our healthcare services who face an ever increasing burden to meet this crisis. The Brighton and Hove Health and Wellbeing Board’s 2014 strategy for the way forward stated that we must... Continue reading

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    Trapped By Golf Courses and Farmland

    by Ross McNally, 8 months ago

    Given that the City Downland Estate is, for much of Brighton and Hove, the gateway from the city to the South Downs National Park, it is frustrating that the city is surrounded on most of its landward side by golf courses or farmland, providing only a select few access points in the form of narrow footpaths and bridleways for people to walk or cycle into the National Park.


    Whilst I would (grudgingly) accept that the SDNP serves a range of land use functions, and that there is perhaps a place for golf on the Downland Estate, it is outrageous that... Continue reading

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    The Importance of Heritage and Archaeology

    by John Funnell (Brighton and Hove Archaeological Society), 9 months ago

    Brighton and Hove City Whole Estate Plan

    The Brighton and Hove Archaeological Society’s Policy with regards the Protection and Preservation of our Heritage: Comments and Recommendations.

    The Society would suggest the County Archaeologist is the main consultant for issues with regards heritage and archaeology, and is made aware of any new projects or developments and that his recommendations about the potential threats to Archaeological Sites are used as a guideline for ensuring their protection.

    Threats to Heritage and Sites Around Brighton and Hove

    Ploughing – Ploughing the most destructive element destroying archaeological sites all over the South Downs.

    Recommend removing... Continue reading

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    Celebrating our pastoral landscale

    by John Meadley, 9 months ago

    The intensification of farming in UK following the second World War, initially to feed the nation but latterly in response to the increasingly intense pressure of market forces, has resulted in significant loss of carbon from the nation’s soil, reduction in soil health, loss of biodiversity and pollution of our waterways. Ruminant animals grazing on pasture, traditionally an integral part of mixed farms where the pasture healed the soil after cultivation, are no longer found on many farms. More than 90% of the nation’s wildflower meadows (and 99% of wildflower floodplain meadows) have disappeared – due to the plough, to... Continue reading

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    Inspiration from Kingsclere Estates - a farm using circular economy principles

    by Vic@FoodPartnership, 9 months ago

    Brighton & Hove City Council are also working on a circular economy route map - in brief the main aims of a circular economy are - To regenerate natural systems / To design out waste and pollution / To keep products and materials in use

    The WEP is a great opportunity to implement these principles in the way that the land is managed - looking for inspiration was recommended Kingsclere Estates who are taking this approach - as their website says

    Understanding and enabling reciprocal connections between plant, animal and human communities, this way of farming is a movement: away... Continue reading

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Page last updated: 12 October 2021, 14:33